What employer looking at your resume

7 Things Employer Will Search For In Your Graphic Design Resume

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What employer looking at your resume

A graphic designer is primarily responsible for creating visual concepts and communicating ideas using software or by hand to captivate the audience. From working on the overall layout to the design for essential consumer marketing tools such as brochures, advertisements, magazines, and reports, it is no surprise that there is a vast demand for graphic designers. However, while having the necessary graphic design skills list to accomplish a designer’s tasks is crucial, it is also essential to be able to relay your expertise and knowledge to potential employers in the best way possible. That’s why it’s vital to have a good graphic design resume. Some aspiring candidates may ask the question, “How to make a graphic design resume?” and “How to list Adobe skills on a resume?” Read on to learn about what employers are looking for in a digital designer resume.

Writing resume with laptop

1. Be concise:

While working on a resume for a graphics designer, it is easy for one to get carried away and want to write pages and pages of the things you’ve accomplished. However, it is vital to keep the critical skills in resume for graphic designer as brief and concise as possible to catch the employer’s eyes quickly. One page is usually enough to relay the significant works you have worked on. If you find yourself having multiple pages, it is best to ask an editor to look at the resume and cut it down. You may want to read online reviews to see whether they can help you edit your application. Hiring managers have a hard enough time screening the number of applications they get, and nobody wants to read pages of graphic designers resumes.

2. Customize your resume:

Every job description has different requirements, and what one employer is looking for might not necessarily be the same thing that another is looking for, even though they’ve both asked for design skills in resume. As such, it is best if you look at every job description carefully and tailor your application to make yourself seem a perfect fit for the job. If an employer has asked for a specific skill, make sure you add it and highlight it in your application. This way, you may also be able to cut back on some accomplishments that aren’t necessary to limit your resume for graphic design to a single page.

3. Be honest:

Understandably, you would want to market yourself as the most worthy of all the candidates to land your dream job. However, we live in the digital age, and when you exaggerate your graphic designer resume skills, it can cost you, since potential employers can look you up online. By exaggerating your resume of graphic designer, you not only risk being caught in a lie but also risk losing the job if you are unable to uphold the standards you set for yourself. This does not mean you need to be utterly honest, though. If there are some things you don’t wish for your employer to find out, you can decide on how much you want to reveal.

Design Sketches portfolio for resume

4. Add examples of your work:

While describing the necessary graphic designer skills for resume, adding the online links to your work can be a significant advantage. In fact, the great graphic design resumes usually include the link to your portfolio as a designer or the link to your personal website, which allows your potential employees to observe and judge your work online. By highlighting all the projects you’ve worked on, you can get a better chance of being shortlisted.

5. Use Keywords:

These days, most companies opt for an applicant tracking system that performs the initial screening by matching keywords in an application to their job description. As such, an applicant must use the relevant keywords, especially when applying for an opening online. This doesn’t mean that you use all the keywords in a graphic design job description resume. By applying due diligence, you can include the most relevant keywords without appearing spammy. A good rule of thumb is to read many job postings and keep a note of the terms that keep appearing.

6. Keep the design minimal:

As a designer, you can be tempted to show off your creative side through resumes for graphic designer. However, it is best to remember that it is best to keep the creativity minimal and focus solely on the graphic design skills for resume. Hence, if an applicant uses images or unusual fonts, chances are the ATS will not be able to read such files. To steer clear of this problem, it is best to keep the creative graphic designer resume elements as low as possible or zero, especially if you apply to online job postings.

7. Highlight your soft skills:

While it is of utmost importance for you to highlight all the technical skills that make you a perfect candidate for the company in the graphic designer description for resume, technical skills are not the only ones that potential employers are looking for. As the workforce becomes more dynamic with thin lines between job responsibilities, a company must find and hire personnel with soft skills. Here are some of the skills you may want to mention:

  1. Problem solving: If you have ever been in a sticky situation in your last job that required you to take over and solve the problem effectively, it may be best to mention it here.
  2. Time management: Let your potential employers know that you will be available for the task required of you and will submit it in a timely manner.
  3. Team player: Since most companies work in teams, it is crucial to mention that you are a team player and can work effectively in teams.

Applying for a job with a well-written resume can exponentially increase your chances of getting shortlisted for an interview. As it is a document that presents the first impression to your hiring manager, candidates must proofread their applications before submitting them. It is always good to have a colleague or resume expert go through it first to check for anomalies.

Credit image:
Coffee vector by macrovector – freepik.com
Working on laptop by lukasbieri – pixabay.com
Sketch Book-Sketch Marker by Stux – pixabay.com